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  #1   IP: 68.88.184.67
Old February 7th, 2004, 07:36 PM
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noel noel is offline
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Default what kitchen appliances need their own circuit?

I wondering about the frig, dishwasher, disposall, compactor, venthood. And as a seperate case, the microwave. At what point does a microwave need to be on a dedicated circuit? when it is a built in?
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  #2   IP: 63.161.185.219
Old February 7th, 2004, 08:06 PM
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I generally put the fridge, dishwasher, and compactor each on a dedicated circuit. Sometimes I put a couple of the dining area receptacles on with the fridge, since there's usually little load on dining area receptacles. The disposal I usually put on a circuit with the light over the sink (if any), since the light switch and the disposal switch will be in the same device box generally. Undercounter hotwater dispensors or water filters requiring electric generally go on the disposal or the dishwasher circuit. Vent hoods don't draw squat, so they can be tied on with anything (like the lighting). If it is a combination vent hood and microwave... this must get a dedicated circuit for good service. Be aware that some of the newer, fancier microwaves need 220 volts (GE's Advantium, for instance), which would require a dedicated circuit. I generally dedicate a circuit for built in microwaves... maybe putting the range hood on with it also. Regular portable microwaves generally get plugged into one of the small appliance receptacles... BUT, if you know where your microwave is going to sit, go ahead and dedicate a circuit to it for good service. These are just rules of thumb I use that have proven to provide good service over time. The only code requirements are the 2 small appliance circuits on the counterspace (for all the little portable appliances).
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  #3   IP: 148.78.243.123
Old February 8th, 2004, 09:03 AM
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To add to mdShunk's thoughts there are two major Code rules that apply.

No lighting, fastened in place appliance and nothing in any other room is allowed to share any circuit serving readily accessible receptacles installed in the kitchen, nook, dining or pantry.

Any fastened in place or dedicated in place appliance [microwave in a microwave cabinet or microwave/hood combo included] that pulls 50% of more of the amp rating of that certain circuit serving it is not allowed to share that circuit with any other loads. One exception to this rule is if you have noncoincidental loads declared by your inspector to be noncoincidental loads that will not run at the same time using the same circuit. The 50% load of a circuit ampacity is the demanding rule in this concern.

Good Luck

Wg
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  #4   IP: 66.59.122.46
Old May 20th, 2005, 04:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wgoodrich
Any fastened in place or dedicated in place appliance [microwave in a microwave cabinet or microwave/hood combo included] that pulls 50% of more of the amp rating of that certain circuit serving it is not allowed to share that circuit with any other loads.
Sorry to trudge up this old thread, but something dawned on me when reading the code this evening. This statement is correct for "fastened in place" equipment, but I can't find any code mandate for this to apply to cord and plug connected "dedicated in place equipment". While I agree that this is a very good idea for "dedicated in place equipment", I can't find it in the code. Can someone help me out?
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  #5   IP: 165.121.58.35
Old May 20th, 2005, 06:50 PM
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I think WG is refering to 210.23. Which permits a 15-20 amp branch circuit for lighting to also supply utilization equipment fastened in place. Yet the load must not exceed 50% of the branch circuit rating. See 210.23(A)1 and (A)(2).

Also note: 210.52(B)

Hope this helps!
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  #6   IP: 66.59.122.122
Old May 20th, 2005, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohm1
I think WG is refering to 210.23. Which permits a 15-20 amp branch circuit for lighting to also supply utilization equipment fastened in place. Yet the load must not exceed 50% of the branch circuit rating. See 210.23(A)1 and (A)(2).

Also note: 210.52(B)

Hope this helps!
Um... yeah, duh. I'm asking about where "dedicated in place" comes in.
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  #7   IP: 24.16.225.236
Old May 20th, 2005, 08:18 PM
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You won't find it because its not there. I think it comes down to what the AHJ considers "fastened". I wouldn't consider dedicated spaces to necessarily be fastened equipment. But something big and bulky (like a fridge, compactor, range, washing machine, etc) I could.
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Last edited by suemarkp : May 20th, 2005 at 08:20 PM.
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  #8   IP: 165.121.60.89
Old May 21st, 2005, 05:05 PM
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MD-
You know WG may be saying that dedicated=Fastened in place. May have just worded it in his own way. Stop making it so damn complicated!
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  #9   IP: 204.210.136.233
Old May 21st, 2005, 05:14 PM
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I really don't see it as that complicated.

My opinion from Suemarkp's post:
fridge - dedicated space, not fastened in place
compactor - fastened
range - dedicated, not faastened
washing machine - dedicated, not fastened

Others:
Dishwasher - fastened
Micro on a shelf - dedicated, not fastened
Over the range micro - fastened
Stove top or wall oven - obviously fastened
Disposal - fastened


If you can simply unplug it and move it, regardless of how big it is I would not consider it fastened in place.
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  #10   IP: 66.59.122.151
Old May 21st, 2005, 05:29 PM
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No, Wg has said on several occasions that the 50% rule also applies to "dedicated in place appliances" that are not necessarily fastened in place. He has even gone on to state that a cord and plug connected microwave that sits on a "microwave shelf" built into the cabinetry is considered the same as a fastened in place appliance. I'm just trying to find in the NEC code, IAEI opinion paper, NFPA ROP, or other document where this has a precedence. I do agree that it's a fine idea, but I'm preparing to bid on a fair number of units that have to be done at such a low per square foot price that the bare minimum is all that will fit into the budget.
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