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  #1   IP: 206.243.170.83
Old February 24th, 2003, 06:20 AM
Anonymous Anonymous is offline
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Default Can you (legally) split 220v in a duplex recepticle?

I know it's possible, but does the code allow this? 20A - 220v breaker wired to a split duplex recepticle where one side of the line goes to the top outlet and the other side to the bottom outlet.

I'd like to wire some outlets like this in my shop to allow me to either plug in 115V tools - which are the most common in my shop - or portable 220v tools (welder - compressor - etc.) using a temporary adapter that plugs into both outlets and wired to the appropriate 220V recepticle.
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  #2   IP: 207.35.6.2
Old February 24th, 2003, 07:03 AM
imported_joed imported_joed is offline
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Yes wyoou can wire a split receptacle as described. The adapter however is not going to be legal I don't think.
I don't know if this is code but it is much safer. Just make it a double wide box with duplex and the proper 220 receptacle.
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  #3   IP: 65.73.69.210
Old February 24th, 2003, 07:05 AM
6pack 6pack is offline
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Yes you can split as asked! The rest would be a safety and code issue that WG will have ideas on. I'm not sure if your allowed to grab off the same circuit? 240 & 120. You can do anything after the fact but not always safe. GL2U
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  #4   IP: 148.78.243.122
Old February 24th, 2003, 05:04 PM
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Wgoodrich Wgoodrich is offline
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Looks like wannabbee and joed posted on top of each other thinking much the same.

This adapter you are trying to create is not legal normally in a house. I do understand that you may be able to buy a UL approved adapter from a motor home outlet that will allow you to take 120 volts from a 220v 4 wire plug.

If it were me I would do as joed suggested and just install a 12/3with ground cable to a double wide box installing a 120 volt duplex receptacle in 1/2 the box and 220 volt single hole receptacle on the other 1/2 of that double gang box splitting off from the black, white, and bare wire to make your 120 volt receptacle and using the same black and the red and bare to make your 220 volt receptacle. Be careful what equipment you use. Some equipment has 220 volt with 120 volt components. Then you will need a four prong 220 volt receptacle instead of a normal 3 prong receptacle.

That way you are not cheating and without question within the NEC rules if using the double gang box and the same cable using a 12/3wGrnd cable. This is only true if both the 120 volt and the 220 volt utilization equipment are 20 amp rated. Do not try to tap a 120 volt 20 amp receptacle from a 30 amp 220 volt circuit, your 120 volt 20 amp receptacle would be over rated in amps.

Hope this helps

Wg
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  #5   IP: 206.243.170.83
Old February 25th, 2003, 05:21 AM
Anonymous Anonymous is offline
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Default Can you (legally) split 220v in a duplex recepticle?

Thanks WG, but I think you have the scenario reversed. I'm not trying to pull 115 of a 220 recepticle, I want to wire a 115 duplex recepticle with the outlets split between L1 and L2. Then I want to adapt a pigtail with two 115 v plugs to a 220v recepticle for my portable 220 equipment for those infrequent times I may use it in each location.

Maybe it will just be easier to put a 220 v recepticle in each location since I'm running the 12/3 there anyway.
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  #6   IP: 148.78.243.122
Old February 25th, 2003, 07:41 PM
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Wgoodrich Wgoodrich is offline
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I understood what you were saying However as I previously said it in not normally allowed to create 220 volt from two 120 volt receptacles. Problem is NEC requires 220 volt to be on a double pole breaker. To my knowledge there is no UL approved adapter to do as you are planning. Best to stay with NEC rules and install a UL listed 220 volt 20 amp receptacle in the same box. You may install a 120 volt receptacle off that same circuit if you like or even two 120 volt receptacles one of each hot line and still have the 220 volt receptacle.

The concern is the afro adapter you are trying to build. You insurance company would love to find that afro engineering if a fire happens. Then they wouldn't have to pay a claim because you wired not within the NEC rules requiring LISTED AND LABELED EQUIPMENT.

Said the same as my last reply, just said it a bit more directly with less tact this time to ensure you understood what I was saying. No offense meant.

Hope this helps

Wg
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  #7   IP: 67.24.58.134
Old February 25th, 2003, 08:03 PM
mfwalker mfwalker is offline
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Woodworker:

I read your post to double check that you could have a duplex 220 20A receptacle in the same (double gang) box as the 120 20A.

I have a simular situation, in that my raceway is the width of a receptacle and all my 120 and 220 outlets are next to each other in the same continuous "box", with the exception of my 30 amp 220 outlet, which is seperated.

This is my understanding of what you are saying... you seperate the outlets (break the connecting bar) in the 20A duplex outlet. The difference then would be "splitting off from the black, white and bare wire" to make the top half of the 120 duplex receptacle and splitting off the red, white, and bare to make the bottom half of the 120 duplex receptacle..."and using the same black and the red and bare to make your 220 volt receptacle."

It is my understanding that you can pigtail the 220 receptacle as long as you have it wired so that it would still be hardwired and functional if you removed the 120 duplex outlet.

This is my guess, I am curious to see wg's comments.

Mark
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  #8   IP: 148.78.243.122
Old February 25th, 2003, 08:25 PM
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Wgoodrich Wgoodrich is offline
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Mark what you are saying I see no problem You are using receptacle rated for 220 volts.

What woodworker is trying to do is use two 120 volt receptacles making an adapter made of two 120 volt male plugs to one 220 volt cord then plugging those two 120 volt male plugs adapted to one 220 volt cord into two different 120 volt receptacles. This is a non UL listed self made product that would violate the NEC unless he can get his Authority Having Jurisdiction to make a ruling in writing approving this design locally. Doubt an AHJ will sign off on that adapter idea though. May be surprised, never know.

Does this help?

Wg
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  #9   IP: 67.24.58.134
Old February 25th, 2003, 08:32 PM
mfwalker mfwalker is offline
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I just noticed wg's new post after I wrote my post...the information I posted was not in light of his information. My question now, understanding the double breaker situation, is this...

If the seperate duplex outlets are in a double gang box...and if the 120 20a duplex outlet and the 220 20a outlet are wired properly from the 12-3, is the only disadvantage having the double breaker fire if any outlet trips it. (I did not understand the intent of trying to mix 120 and 220 in one duplex outlet.)

Thanks for increasing my understanding.

Mark
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  #10   IP: 148.78.243.122
Old February 25th, 2003, 08:53 PM
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Wgoodrich Wgoodrich is offline
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Mark He is trying to make 220 volts giving power to one cord to a 220 volt appliance using two 120 volt plugs plugged into two different 120 volt receptacles on two different 120 volt branch circuits.

What you were talking about there is no disadvantage to splitting a 220 volt branch circuit to make two 120 volt receptacles and then a 220 volt receptacle on that same 220 volt multiwire branch circuit as long as it is done properly. This is done every day and you are using UL listed material.

Woodworker is making his own adapter from two separate 120 volt receptacles on different circuits to make one 220 volt cord to serve one 220 volt piece of equipment. NEC 110.3 requires that you use listed and labeled equipment.

Hope this helps

Wg
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