dcsimg
Self Help Forums

Go Back   Self Help Forums > Building > Electrical Code - CANADIAN
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Today's Posts

Electrical Code - CANADIAN 2002 Version - Commercial or Residential for CANADA

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   IP: 142.179.56.129
Old October 28th, 2010, 11:38 PM
thejester thejester is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 6
Default 220V baseboard heaters

Hi
I'm new to this forum mainly because I'm having a problem finding a wiring diagram for three (three foot) 220V baseboard heaters using a single thermostat. Mind you, I'm not really computer literate.
I know I need a double pole 20A breaker, 10/2 wire and I'm not too sure about the thermostat to use. Any help on these two items (wiring diagram and thermostat) would be most appreciated.

Mike
Reply With Quote
  #2   IP: 130.76.32.209
Old October 29th, 2010, 09:34 AM
suemarkp suemarkp is offline
Super Moderator

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Kent, WA
Posts: 8,265
Default

How many watts is your 3' heater? I think they are usually around 500W which means 1500W total. This will easily fit on a 20A circuit, so you only need #12 wire instead of #10. If these are 240V heaters, you could even use a 15A circuit if you want and use #14 wire.

You'll need to get a double pole thermostat, and most baseboard thermostats are rated for up to 24 amps. This will have 4 wires -- two for the power source and two to go to the heaters. Run your power cable to the thermostat box. Color the white wire red at both ends. Connect these two wires to the input wires of the thermostat (if you're lucky it would be black to black and red to red).

The next part you have two options. You can run 3 separate cables from the thermostat box, one to each heater. Or, you run a cable to the first heater. Then from there, run a cable to the second one. And then again run a cable from the second to the third. You could even do a combination of the these.

Having all the wires in the thermostat box may be too crowded unless you have a box that is 25 cubic inches or larger (assuming #12 wire). But if you do it here again you recolor all the white wires red and put all the reds to one hot output of the thermostat (use the red if it is so colored). Combine all the blacks together too with the other hot output from the thermostat.

If daisy chaining (going power to heater1 to heater 2 to heater 3), again you connect the wire to the first heater to the thermostat output (black to black, red to red). At the baseboard heater, connect the cable from the thermostat, the cable going to the next heater, and the baseboard heater itself by matching colors (blacks to black, reds to reds).

If all the heaters and thermostat only have black wires, it doesn't really matter. You just have to realize there are two hot wires and both of those wires need to go to each device (but both wires can't touch each other, they need to be kept in two separate bundles). Color coding just helps keep things straight so you don't short out the circuit.
__________________
Mark
Kent, WA
Reply With Quote
  #3   IP: 142.179.56.129
Old October 29th, 2010, 09:35 PM
thejester thejester is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 6
Default

Thanks Mark. That was very clearly explained. Who needs a wiring diagram?

Mike
Reply With Quote
  #4   IP: 142.179.56.129
Old November 3rd, 2010, 09:11 AM
thejester thejester is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 6
Default

Now that I have the heaters in hand I find out they are 1000w @ 240V or 750w @ 208V. Am I to assume that I have 240V? Jeez they have to make things difficult because I was under the belief that we had 220V in Canada.
Reply With Quote
  #5   IP: 142.179.56.129
Old November 3rd, 2010, 09:22 AM
thejester thejester is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 6
Default

"You just have to realize there are two hot wires and both of those wires need to go to each device (but both wires can't touch each other, they need to be kept in two separate bundles). Color coding just helps keep things straight so you don't short out the circuit."
__________________

I'm not sure I understand that statement about both wires can't touch each other. You're not talking about the insulation coating I hope. I'm going to daisy chain the heaters and I was thinking of running a red wire through the frame of each heater to I wouldn't have to loop it around the outside. It would have to run along side the black wire that is in there. Maybe due to the heat I can't do that??
Reply With Quote
  #6   IP: 130.76.32.209
Old November 3rd, 2010, 11:46 AM
suemarkp suemarkp is offline
Super Moderator

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Kent, WA
Posts: 8,265
Default

Residential should be 240V. Industrial, or some apartment buildings that are large enough, would be 208V. Your heater will work on either voltage, it just makes less heat at the lower voltage.

The insulated wires can touch each other. What I was trying to say was connect black to black and red to red. If red and black are directly connected, they will short out and trip the breaker.

Whether you can run a pair of wires through the heater depends on whether it is listed to be a wiring raceway and whether there are any high temperature wiring requirements in that space. It would be better to put the wiring in the walls from box to box. This lets you remove a heater without wrecking the connection to the others. Would also allow you to easily change the size of heater installed.

I'm also not sure if Canada requires that you use cable with red and black insulation for a 240V circuit. I know they sell it there. In the US, we can remark a white wire in a cable to red.
__________________
Mark
Kent, WA
Reply With Quote
  #7   IP: 142.179.56.129
Old November 3rd, 2010, 09:51 PM
thejester thejester is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 6
Default

Thanks again. Yes we can mark the white or black with red. It's just to let others know that it is live.

Mike
Reply With Quote
Reply






Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2002 - QuinStreet, Inc.
http://www.selfhelpforums.com