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  #1   IP: 74.207.185.78
Old August 19th, 2010, 03:14 PM
polklip polklip is offline
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Default how thick and what kind of plywood should i use for my manufactured homes floor?

the most bottom part of the floor is what im referring to. i dont know if its called a subfloor, but the bottom that gets screwed to the floor braces. i have children. i havent decided on carpet or hardwood yet. im trying to compare prices and get the best deal for my dollar. thanks for your help!
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  #2   IP: 75.110.94.120
Old August 19th, 2010, 06:38 PM
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pushkins pushkins is offline
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You would want to use at least 5/8", I like Advantech available at Lowe's/HD or any good lumber supply house.
Check to see what size has already been used as your obviously going to have to match up sheets.
If it's in a bathroom or laundry you might want to consider treated or the same size.
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  #3   IP: 69.97.8.180
Old August 19th, 2010, 07:16 PM
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Wgoodrich Wgoodrich is offline
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How far apart are you floor joists ? Why are you replacing a sub floor in a manufactured home ? Are you planning on two layers of floor sheathing or one ?

Curious

Wg
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  #4   IP: 12.6.9.83
Old August 20th, 2010, 09:10 AM
HooKooDooKu HooKooDooKu is offline
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I would think you would want to use "tounge-and-groove" plywood for a subfloor.

Most places like Lowe's and Home Depot usually carry one style of "subfloor" plywood that is usually about 3/4" thick (11/16, 23/32, or what ever) with tounge-n-groove edges.
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  #5   IP: 142.167.30.252
Old August 20th, 2010, 02:56 PM
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MJ CORMIER MJ CORMIER is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HooKooDooKu View Post
I would think you would want to use "tounge-and-groove" plywood for a subfloor.

Most places like Lowe's and Home Depot usually carry one style of "subfloor" plywood that is usually about 3/4" thick (11/16, 23/32, or what ever) with tounge-n-groove edges.
I think the answer was covered in the first 2 replies.
MJCormier
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  #6   IP: 75.207.222.101
Old August 20th, 2010, 07:10 PM
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Wgoodrich Wgoodrich is offline
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If you are using plywood normally there is a two number stamp on the plywood. The number would be ??/??. The bigger number is the spanning capability of the plywood for attaching to rafters. The small number is the spanning capability of the plywood for attaching to floor joists.

Wg
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  #7   IP: 72.244.206.152
Old August 23rd, 2010, 05:37 PM
GBR in WA GBR in WA is offline
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Don’t feel badly about the terminology. Many people mix the terms sheathing (used on walls, roofs) with sub-flooring and underlayment: http://bct.nrc.umass.edu/index.php/p...ient-flooring/
Some research on your sub-flooring: http://bct.eco.umass.edu/index.php/p...d-and-plywood/
We really need more information from you, as mentioned…….
Be safe, Gary
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