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  #1   IP: 131.37.206.6
Old December 15th, 2009, 06:09 AM
nate nate is offline
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Default Boiler Closet

The boiler and water heater for my house are located in the garage.

I am going to build a closet to enclose them since I use the garage to weld, paint, etc and would rather not have all that ending up on the aftermentioned items.

Is there a requirement that I drywall the inside and outside of this closet?? I have no reason to drywall the inside if it's not required, not to mention it will be a royal PITA to do it.
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  #2   IP: 75.110.94.120
Old December 15th, 2009, 06:50 AM
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I don't think there is any requirement to drywall the interior side, but there is a requirement to allow enough ventilation, usually achieved via louvered door/s.
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  #3   IP: 98.30.163.230
Old December 15th, 2009, 07:26 AM
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If you are doing anything that produces explosive fumes, this will not protect you from a possible ignition hazzard. If this is the case you may be better with a outside air source and sealing this room and door. give some time to see if other posters reply with more info on this.

In either case you need to make sure you have enough air coming into the room or it can create a carbon monoxide hazzard. The manual for your water heater and boiler will specify the size of the air inlet or the louvers required to the room. The inside wont need finished but you need to meet the min. distance requirements for both units. Also consider room size for maintenance and replacement of the units. (dont use too small of a door and make sure you can move the water heater around the boiler, ect). You also need a light in the room as well as a maintenance outlet (GFI protected)

If your only goal is to keep the equipment clean and looks are not as important you can find or make some welding shield partitions. If you build them, make sure they are not combustable.
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  #4   IP: 72.35.125.144
Old December 15th, 2009, 11:01 AM
nate nate is offline
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The water heater is an indirect fired unit tied into the boiler and the boiler is a sealed combustion chamber which gets the combustion air from outside.

For the doors I was going to use sliding closet doors with a 6ft opening so more or less the room will be open almost 100% from the front.

I'm not trying to make it air tight or anything like that, but just clean up the corner and keep the bulk of the dust/dirt off it.

Oh... water softener and water filter will be in there as well.

I have not come up with a good way to enclose the heat pipes on the left yet. Softener is in front of the check valve by the water main.
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  #5   IP: 98.30.163.230
Old December 15th, 2009, 11:48 AM
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That makes it alot easier...

In the case of the piping/valving you could build a box that covers everything and sticks out a foot or so. have it open into the mech room for air flow but design it so it slides out of the way if you need to get in there to work on the system which shouldnt be often. You can paint it up to match the garage walls and it shouldn't be too noticable.
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  #6   IP: 75.110.94.120
Old December 15th, 2009, 02:45 PM
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That is one VERY neat plumbing job.
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  #7   IP: 72.35.125.144
Old December 16th, 2009, 01:28 AM
nate nate is offline
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That is something I was thinking of doing, thanks for confirming my idea isn't totally off the wall!

I was happy to find out that the boiler is setup that way. I have lived in a few houses before that had the gas fired water heater and the boiler/furnace in the garage and it was a concern of mine when making fumes like from painting.

One house I lived had a forced air system with the furnace in the garage and if I painted or welded in there without opening the garage door, it would pull fumes into the house!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr T View Post
That makes it alot easier...

In the case of the piping/valving you could build a box that covers everything and sticks out a foot or so. have it open into the mech room for air flow but design it so it slides out of the way if you need to get in there to work on the system which shouldnt be often. You can paint it up to match the garage walls and it shouldn't be too noticable.

Last edited by nate : December 16th, 2009 at 01:32 AM.
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