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  #1   IP: 216.56.28.53
Old January 8th, 2009, 12:34 AM
soloncamper soloncamper is offline
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Default moving warm air duct

Let me set the scene... A bathroom that is roughly 6x10 with only one exterior wall (6 feet). A warm air duct feeds this room in a bad spot. I want the tub/shower on that wall. I would like to turn that duct 180 degrees to feed into a hallway and heat the bathroom with in floor radiant heat. My question is, how hard is it to turn around a duct? I haven't gotten into the wall yet to see how it was put together. At the end of a run, is the part that feeds into the room usually a "cap" on the end of the rectangular duct that can simply be turned around.

Thanks in advance,

John
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  #2   IP: 148.78.63.154
Old January 8th, 2009, 07:53 AM
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Wgoodrich Wgoodrich is offline
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A hallway is an interior area with four warm walls normally not needing heat. I would disconnect the heat duc from its source and blank off the opening in the source probably being a trunk line. This will give you your most unchange balance of heat in your home. If you heat in your home is balanced trying not to change that balance is your best design.

Most often a bathroom is not heated at all. Might try it without heat first then if you have to a radiant heater is your best design. Remember any air flow across a wet body will feel cold to that wet body.

Good Luck

Wg
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  #3   IP: 165.234.31.11
Old January 8th, 2009, 10:19 AM
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Bismarck Jack Bismarck Jack is offline
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Wink

I tried to convince my wife of that Wg when i wanted to block off the bathroom register and intall electric. she said it dries things out too much. i sort of agree...as it is dry up here in the north during winter. my basement is all electric and upstairs is all GFA. We have to run a small humidifyer to keep from arching a 3 foot spark when folding the blankets downstairs LOL.

although that can be fun for the devious at heart!!
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  #4   IP: 216.56.28.53
Old January 8th, 2009, 09:08 PM
soloncamper soloncamper is offline
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Disconnecting the duct at the source is a good idea. When I remove that, will ther be a problem with the furnace blowing too much air through the other ducts? Will that cause some sort of mechanical problem? We are going to put the electric in floor heat in just for the comfort. We had it in our last house and loved it.

Thanks,

John
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  #5   IP: 76.22.81.239
Old January 8th, 2009, 11:28 PM
suemarkp suemarkp is offline
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Shutting off one duct shouldn't hurt anything unless there are only a few ducts for the whole system. Closing off a duct will increase total static pressure and decrease total flow a bit. But the air that was coming out of that closed duct now has to come out of others. So more air will flow out of each duct even though total system flow is reduced. The system seems to find equilibrium this way. Only thing bad is if the total CFM flow is insufficient to remove enough heat from the heat exchanger and it gets too hot which triggers a shutdown.
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  #6   IP: 71.36.210.108
Old January 9th, 2009, 06:28 AM
Fischer Fischer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soloncamper View Post
Let me set the scene... A bathroom that is roughly 6x10 with only one exterior wall (6 feet). A warm air duct feeds this room in a bad spot. I want the tub/shower on that wall. I would like to turn that duct 180 degrees to feed into a hallway and heat the bathroom with in floor radiant heat. My question is, how hard is it to turn around a duct? I haven't gotten into the wall yet to see how it was put together. At the end of a run, is the part that feeds into the room usually a "cap" on the end of the rectangular duct that can simply be turned around.

Thanks in advance,

John
You could certainly turn the vent around. You might have to reposition the pipe a bit, but it should work. To answer Mark's question about restricting to much airflow, a vent with a damper would be able to adjust if needed. If you're hallway is too warm the added heat will dissapate throughout the house and adjacent room, no biggy. Added plus to that warm hallway, is that it wouldn't be such a shock coming out of a warm bath when you're damp into a much colder room.

Your question begs for differing opinions, and this is just one more.
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Last edited by Fischer : September 15th, 2011 at 08:15 AM.
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