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Thread: what exactly are "running threads that are prohibited by the code?

  1. #1

    Default what exactly are "running threads that are prohibited by the code?

    I understand running threads to be 2 pieces of rigid threaded pipe joined by a coupler. Is this correct? If not, what are running threads?

    Is a 3 piece union required any place 2 threaded ends of pipe meet?

    Specifically, I was looking at the scrap pile and saw 2 threaded ends of 2" rigid each 4 feet long. I pieced them together with a coupler and used it for a service riser. I was proud of the fact I saved $50 for a stick of Rigid 2", but was wondering if those were indeed running threads, as prohibited by code.

    Thanks guys!

    PS, it should be noted that rigid pipe SUCKS!

  2. #2

  3. #3

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    Like Ron's great link shows...
    Running threads are the cheaters way of getting out of using a 3 piece coupling (a.k.a. Erickson coupling). You'll see this from time to time. I've never (fingers crossed, looking up at the sky) done such a thing before.

    There are, however, UL and inspector endorsed "running thread nipples", which are basically all-thread nipples that you can cut to length in the field. These get installed double locknutted. at both ends. You're not allowed to use a coupling with them.
    "Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool"

  4. #4

    Default

    So what then, would be an accepted use of a rigid coupling?

  5. #5

    Default

    No, Paul. You don't get it. You can use a rigid coupling under almost any circumstance. "Running threads" are when you run 2 or three times the amount of required threads on one end of a piece of rigid so that you can spin the coupling completely on to one piece of the pipe, and then put another pipe up to the end of that one and spin the coupling onto the second piece, leaving it centered up. Some people "cheat" this way when you can't spin either piece of pipe. When you can't sping either piece of pipe to use a regular coupling, you need to use the 3 piece coupling or "erickson" coupling (sometimes improperly called a "union"). Under ordinary circumstances where you can spin at least one section of the rigid pipe, you can use the regular coupling.
    "Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool"

  6. #6
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    Default

    We call them all threads. Here is a pic of one that is listed:
    Last edited by Ohm1; September 29th, 2006 at 12:10 AM.
    Learning brings success. While you are waiting, I'm getting better!

  7. #7

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    Oh, I see said the blind man to his deaf daughter...

    Thanks for the help!

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