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Thread: using a 220v US tool in Philippines

  1. #1

    Exclamation using a 220v US tool in Philippines

    I am retiring to the Philippines and I have some tools with a 220V motor. Can I safely attach a 220V 110-0-110 motor to a 220-0 circuit. Unlike most of the rest of the world, The Philippines uses the same frequency (60Hz) as the USA so motor speeds are not an issue. Thank you

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    8,533

    Default

    Maybe. Most tools won't care about the neutral, they just want hot, hot, and ground. The only issue I see if that you will have 0V to ground on one leg, and 240V to ground on the other. Your tool was designed with the assumption that the highest voltage to ground would be 120V, not 240V. However, there isn't a whole lot of difference when designing between those two cases. It is possible you could have something short out because it is too close to the grounded enclosure.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  3. #3

    Default a little confused

    This may sound stupid but when trying to get my head around split phase 240, my understanding is that it looks at the difference in power across the 2 hot terminals, +120, and -120. If that is the case, should i wire the motor with the hot on 1 pole and the return on the other hot pole to create the 240V differential?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    LaLa Land, NW Ohio
    Posts
    4,767

    Default

    <WARNING> Do not make fun of my "art" You've been warned.
    Code:
    what you have in the Philippines:
    
    Your transformer outside your house...
    
    utility                      
     side
    |     |
    |     |
    uuuuuuu
    =======   transformer
    nnnnnnn
    |     |
    |     |
    2     0 (grounded leg)
    4     v
    0
    v   
    
    
    What your power "looks" like.....
    
       * *                    <---  240V
     *     *
    *        *               (there is no center tap on the transfomer here)
               *       *
                *     *
                  * *         <--- 0v   (grounded leg)
    You do not have a center tapped transformer like in the US. One side of your transformer is grounded. The only voltage that comes out is 240V.


    Code:
    In the US:
    
    Our transformer outside our house...
    
    utility                      
     side
    |     |
    |     |
    uuuuuuu
    =======   transformer
    nnnnnnn
    |  |  |
    |  |  |
    1  0  1 
    2  v  2
    0     0
    v     v
       ^
       |   
       (grounded leg)
    
    What our power "looks" like...
       * *                    <---   120V
     *     *
    *        *         
    ---------------------     <---    0v
               *       *
                *     *
                  * *        <---   120v
    For US power, we have 2 120V legs.. they are 180degrees out of phase to each other (AC power is a sine wave). The difference between the 120V's is 240V. (There is no positive or negative in AC power). However the difference between either 120V and ground is 120V. We can get 120V or 240V out of our panels. Each 120V leg is one 'side' of our breaker panels. For devices like dryers or your power tool it is connected to both legs.

    With US 240V, if you touched 1 leg of US 240V you would only get zapped with 120V. The only way you can get 'shocked' with 240V is to grab both 120V legs and be insulated from the ground (do not try this!). Several 'failures' would have to happen. If you contacted Philippines 240v you would get the full 240V no matter what. This is one of the reasons that US voltage is limited to 120V from ground in residential units.

    Hopefully this helps. Philippines 240V is not the same as US 240V.

    If your device has any electronics (speed control) in it, I would not try it. There are likely tranformers that convert Philippines 240V to a center tapped/split 240V circuit. This would be the ideal solution, but not cheap for large loads!

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