dcsimg
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Crimping sleeves or wire nuts?

  1. #1

    Unhappy Crimping sleeves or wire nuts?

    I'm doing some DIY wiring and most of my experience has been working on my own house. When collecting the bare grounds in an outlet/fixture box, I add a pigtail to attach to the grounding screw, twist them tightly with lineman's pliars, clip them cleanly at the end and twist on a wire nut nice and tight.

    My current job needs to be permitted, and I hear from local pro electricians that the inspectors in the area are expecting to see these bare grounds twisted and crimped with sleeves.

    Attached is a picture of my stripping/crimping pliers. Will these pliers do an adequate job of crimping? I've heard of crimping pliers that make an even crimp all around the sleeve, but understand these crimpers may cost $50.

    I did not see any special crimping pliers at HD or Lowe's. do I need special crimping pliers or will my present pliers work satisfactorily?
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by jonfisher45; October 1st, 2010 at 10:51 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Central Minnesota
    Posts
    1,421

    Default

    First find out if they actually require you to use crimps.

    If they do, instead of using the copper crimps and a Buchanan 4 way crimper (which are fairly expensive if you don't have much crimping to do) You can use steel crimp sleeves and a lineman's pliers that has a crimp die behind the pivot point.

    Those multipurpose strippers that you picture are really only good for is the red blue and yellow insulated "Stak-on" terminals. (and even that is questionable in my opinion)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Welland Ontario
    Posts
    4,782

    Default

    Crimps or wire nuts are both code compliant unless you have a local amendment requiring crimps.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Crimps are nice because they save space.

  5. #5

    Default I'm checking

    OK, I'm asking a wider group of people about this "crimping, but no wire nuts" business. I suppose the only way to nail this is to try and get an inspector on the phone and see if wire nuts are acceptable in this context. Obviously you cannot crimp all current-carrying wires on a regular basis because then you'd have to adopt a whole system of crimping with brand-name insulators to boot... and that would knock some DIY people out of the game. I'm not sure the code inspectors care, though.

    It's easy to see that crimps are a step up above wire nuts, and I have no real algument about that. They are much less likely to loosen over time, but we're not talking about a fiercely vibrating motor, here... just a wall socket in a dining room.

  6. #6

    Default Thinking it over

    For shame... I'm replying to my own post!

    God knows I've encountered my share of bare copper ground tangles stuffed into fixture and receptacle boxes without they're being connected to anything in particular.

    And I don't think any inspector ever saw -- much less approved any of the miswired, dangerous combinations we've all seen in junction/switch boxes.

    You can forcibly upgrade all kinds of equipment and practice requirements, but that's not going to stop sloppy workmanship by third rate electricians and lax DIYers.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    8,427

    Default

    I'd use wire nuts if you can. The crimps are one shot. If you need to add something later, it makes it more difficult (either you cut off the crimp connector, or tie into the tail if you can). If you want to remove a cable from a box, then you have to cut it out of the crimp and hope they didn't twist them all together first.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  8. #8

    Default To: Junkcollector

    Quote Originally Posted by junkcollector View Post
    First find out if they actually require you to use crimps.

    If they do, instead of using the copper crimps and a Buchanan 4 way crimper (which are fairly expensive if you don't have much crimping to do) You can use steel crimp sleeves and a lineman's pliers that has a crimp die behind the pivot point.
    Junkcollector,

    My lineman's pliers do have some sort of serrated gripping surface below the pivot point (see pictures). Will this enable me to use the steel crimp sleeves?
    Looks like the sleeve would just be mashed flat. Is this satisfactory?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	linemans pliers.jpg 
Views:	0 
Size:	48.2 KB 
ID:	3383   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	crimp die.jpg 
Views:	0 
Size:	54.1 KB 
ID:	3385  
    Last edited by jonfisher45; October 3rd, 2010 at 02:01 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Central Minnesota
    Posts
    1,421

    Default

    I was thinking of something more like this:

    http://idealindustries.com/prodDetai...iers&l3=30-430


  10. #10

    Default

    I understand the plier type.

    What do you think of this as a strategy?

    I'll ask for my rough inspection with all wires in the boxes trimmed to 6-8", neatly folded back into the box. I will leave one box (the first one he is likely to see) with all wires out, and ask at that point whether (s)he prefers wire nuts or crimp sleeves.

    All the rest of my work looks very neat and organized (almost military).

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •