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Thread: pipes interfering with drywall

  1. #1

    Default pipes interfering with drywall

    I've been fixing up the ceiling in my garage, which is under living space. The ceiling joists need to be covered with 5/8" drywall since the furnace is in the garage.
    But there are plumbing lines going in and out of the space between the ceiling joists, and running parallel to the ceiling joists, where the drywall would go.
    So the best I can do is to fill up the space between the pipes with pieces of drywall. It's quite a mess.
    I suppose to satisfy the building code, I should seal up the gaps between the drywall and the pipes with something. What? Some kind of fire-retardant foam? "Great stuff"?
    thanks
    Laura

  2. #2
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    Not sure if its compliant, but you could put a piece of drywall behind the pipes up in the joist space (resting on the pipes). Then put one over the joists next to and touching the pipes. This should be sealed with drywall compound.

    Ideally, you'd cut the pipes and extend by 5/8" so you can run on top of the drywall or shorten them so they are up inside the joist space.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by suemarkp View Post
    Not sure if its compliant, but you could put a piece of drywall behind the pipes up in the joist space (resting on the pipes). Then put one over the joists next to and touching the pipes. This should be sealed with drywall compound.
    Are you sure that having the drywall interrupted by pipes, without a second layer of drywall, is against the code?
    The drain pipes from the bathroom go through the garage ceiling, and they have to. So there must be some kind of allowance in the building code for the drywall barrier being interrupted by pipes.
    The previous owner built a second drywall ceiling 18" below the real ceiling. Perhaps to hide the pipes going in and out of the ceiling. It formed a lovely rat home, so I dismantled it.
    A plumber who was working around there said that the pipes weren't done professionally, he said they weren't supposed to be right next to each other as they are. I don't know if a building inspector would care about that? If so, maybe I do want to hide the pipes
    Is foam not OK to fill gaps? It would be a lot easier than drywall compound.

    Ideally, you'd cut the pipes and extend by 5/8" so you can run on top of the drywall or shorten them so they are up inside the joist space.
    I asked a plumber about doing that sort of thing. He thought it seemed like a real pain - which it would be - and didn't see the point. It's a real mess of pipes, wires, etc.

    thanks
    Laura

  4. #4
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    Vertical penetrations through the ceiling can be sealed with firestop caulk. It was just laying the sheet behind the pipes running along the length of the joist that seems non compliant -- it should probably be attached to the structure somehow.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  5. #5
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    Do the pipe run below the ceiling joists and by how much ?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by pushkins View Post
    Do the pipe run below the ceiling joists and by how much ?
    There are various pipes that are partly in and partly out of the space between the joists - a big drain pipe, and water supply pipes maybe 5/8" in diameter, and pipes going from the water heater into the space between the joists. And wiring going in and out.
    Below that there are heating ducts. Drywall wouldn't fit between the pipes and the heating ducts.

    So if I were to make a drywall ceiling below the heating ducts, it would be something like 12-18" below the joists. That's what the previous owner did. I don't like that idea. It would be almost impossible to seal. Rats died in there when the previous owner did it. Also it's better to be able to see the pipe and ducts and wiring in case of problems, not to hide them in drywall.

    I can put in pieces of drywall, attached one way or another to the joists, and caulk where the pipes interrupt the drywall. Maybe cover the pipes with caulk? So foam wouldn't do, it has to be caulk?

    Laura

  7. #7

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    From what you discribe you are trying to butte drywall against pipes half in and half out of the drywall. This does not meet code minimum standards. You are required 5/8" drywall per Code on a garage ceiling that has a living area above that garage. The ceiling must be sealed tight to any pipes or ducts or wires by using spakling or fire caulk.

    From what you discribe the only way I see you can meet the code intent is to build a ceiling below the pipes and ducts using ceiling joists then drywall to that lowered ceiling. You are allowed to install a couple of access holes also closed with 5/8" drywall to be lifted out when accessing between the floor and lowered ceiling. The ceiling with 5/8" drywall is required per IRC rules sealed tight around any pertrusions.

    Good Luck

    Wg

  8. #8
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    You could lower the ceiling height to just cover the pipe work and build a soffit box around the lower duct work. then simply cover it all in 5/8" drywall to meet all codes.

  9. #9

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    Pushkin, now your talking, best plan yet !

    Wg

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by pushkins View Post
    You could lower the ceiling height to just cover the pipe work and build a soffit box around the lower duct work. then simply cover it all in 5/8" drywall to meet all codes.
    Sort of, though the box would have to have a heating duct going into a vertical side, and similarly vertical openings for the drain pipe and water supply pipes. But if you seal around those, that's all right? It would be a lot of work.

    The drain pipe and the water supply pipes rise gently, so they are nearly horizontal. The reason the water supply pipes go below the level of the ceiling joists is that there's a large metal I-beam that is perpendicular to the ceiling joists and at the same level. So the pipes are routed below the I-beam, then they go up again into the joist space. Maybe the I-beam is there to support the floor, I don't know.

    The drain pipe has to rise gently into the space between the joists, it can't have bends.

    Laura
    Last edited by Lacustral; July 29th, 2010 at 05:34 PM.

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