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Thread: Intermatic timer install

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3

    Talking Intermatic timer install

    We purchased a "new to us" house and my wife and I are fixing stuff all over the place.
    I got real tired of remembering to turn that darn pool pump on and off all the time. Thus a Timer is needed.

    A few days ago i purchased an ET100C from the depot.

    Electronic Time Switch.
    24 hr control.
    120V SP.
    3 yr battery life (assuming its alkaline - AA)

    after reading their install instructions and viewing their diagram, something wasn't right. If i wired as per their instructions it'll go poof.

    After some consultation with friends and searching web for some plain up front info. i found this site. It seemed to be the best place for info that was close. Although not finding an exact match to my predicament the info here was useful and helpful.

    So i've decided to post my working timer install for those who may run into the same problem. Hopefully it will prove useful to others.

    Hmm, don't seem to be able to insert pics.

    i'll try to explain it clearly

    Note power is OFF....Label box if you have to to warn others of what your doing.

    1. Source power (14/2 power from a 20 amp breaker in a sub-panel)
    2. Timer box with removable timer mechanism.
    3. short jumper wire.
    4. wire continues to the pump.

    My wiring from 1. leaves the source and enters the timer box. The white wire attaches to terminal 1 labelled as LOAD. The HOT wire (black) from 1. (source) attaches to terminal 2.

    Next i cut a small jumper wire from an un-used piece of wiring. I used black out of habit of keeping to colour coding. I attached the jumper wire to terminals 2 and 3 (labelled as line and line1 on the plastic cover).

    Next was a attachment of the last available black wire that continues to the pump. This goes to terminal 4 (labelled as LOAD on the plastic cover).

    Finally the only wire left is white and it was attached to terminal 1. (this ensures that the nuetral carries through completly.

    After making sure all terminals are snug I replaced the plastic cover, turned on the breaker, check voltages across terminals. And don't forget to attach the ground wires to the ground screw provided in the box.

    Pressed the button on the display to set the manual operation and pressed the other button to on and bingo my pool pump turned on.

    The instructions in the installation paperwork for programing times are correct.
    So that was easy, I tried to set mine for off-peak times as that is an expanding issue with hydro use these days.

    Later i'll flip the switch to AUTO and forget it till closing time.

    The afore-mentioned wiring diagram that came in the install papers makes the hook up look like you are jumping more than just #2 and #3 terminals.
    It makes is look as tho you also have to jump #1 and #4. BAD DRAWING as far as i am concerned.

    ok, tried attaching the pics (3)
    bad drawing
    box attached to interior wall
    wired connections in working order.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Somanychoices; August 4th, 2007 at 03:11 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Central Minnesota
    Posts
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    I don't know how much amperage your pump draws but you said
    Quote Originally Posted by Somanychoices View Post
    (14/2 power from a 20 amp breaker in a sub-panel)
    14/2 is over fused at 20 A.

    Unless there is special instructions that came with your pump you need to replace that breaker to a 15 amp.
    Last edited by junkcollector; August 4th, 2007 at 05:35 PM. Reason: had an error

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3

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    Amperage is 11/5.5

    Happens to be a hayward superpump if that's of any use to you

    ok, since i have one that'll be easy enough

    ty
    Last edited by Somanychoices; August 4th, 2007 at 04:30 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
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    Motors and pumps are permitted to have larger than usual breakers on wires (especially if hard wired). However, your 11 amp pump should work fine on a 15A breaker and I'd change it to a 15A since you have one.

    The drawing isn't confusing to me. The LOAD in the diagram is your pump motor, and I don't see anything like a jumper except from 2 to 3.

    It appears you're in Canada, and they may have different rules than the US for pool pumps. Here, if this is a permanent pool or deeper than 42", the pump circuit must be run in conduit and have an insulated grounding wire (not a bare one inside a sheath covering).
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
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    it does run through conduit upon exiting the house and heading to the pool shed.

    would it be better to have it all in conduit ?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Central Minnesota
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    I forgot to mention that I don't think the diagram that you attached is confusing either. I don't know of a better way that they could have done it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Somanychoices
    it does run through conduit upon exiting the house and heading to the pool shed.

    would it be better to have it all in conduit ?
    I don't understand, what isn't in conduit?
    Hey, I'm a senior member Now!
    Last edited by junkcollector; August 4th, 2007 at 05:42 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Kent, WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Somanychoices View Post
    it does run through conduit upon exiting the house and heading to the pool shed.

    would it be better to have it all in conduit ?
    Better/worse, who's to say...

    In the NEC, the wiring inside a building to a pool pump can be run in cabling. Once it leaves the building, you need conduit with an insulated ground (so no romex in conduit -- must be a green insulated ground.)

    So from your picutres, the wiring to and from the timer must be inside a building.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  8. #8

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    I have a ¾ horse Hayward pump that draws 15 amps on 120v & 8 amps on 240.. We never turn our pump off from the time we open till close it for the season. Did I miss it or where is your ground fault located MAX……..
    Last edited by Max; August 5th, 2007 at 09:43 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Kent, WA
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    If the pump is hardwired, a GFCI is not required.

    Running the pump 24/7 keeps the water nice and clean. But the recommended standard is to turn over all the water once per day. At 40 GPM, I can turn over my 16,000 gallons in 7 hours and I run my pump for 8 hours.

    A 15 amp 120V pump uses about 1.8 KW as it runs. If you ran that pump for 24 hours instead of just 8, it would cost about 28 Kw-Hr extra per day. At 8 cents per Kw-HR, this is $2.25 per day or over $70/month. It won't take too long to pay off the cost of a timer with numbers like this.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Boston, MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Max View Post
    I have a ¾ horse Hayward pump that draws 15 amps on 120v & 8 amps on 240.. We never turn our pump off from the time we open till close it for the season. Did I miss it or where is your ground fault located MAX……..
    Around here it is required to have your pool pump on a timer
    I upgraded from a 1hp pump to 1.5hp pump that pulls a Max of 18.3a at 120v. I'll be connecting it at 240v so it will only pull a little over 9a
    I also upgraded the filter that was bigger then the old one, & 33% bigger then the charts said I needed. The extra hp goes towards a solar heating system on the roof
    I now only run the pool pump around 4 hours a day & the pool is nice & clean
    If we have a party I keep the pump running.

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