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imported_gbeichho
June 15th, 2003, 09:02 PM
Location: Ontario, Canada

I have a cottage which has electric baseboard heaters in about 6 different rooms. 5 of them are wired as separate ciruits into the main breaker panel (taking up 10 precious slots). The load of any 2 of these heaters is well within the rating of 14/2 wiring and a 15A breaker.

I was told that I could just wire the two circuits in a single breaker in the panel by an electrician.

It makes sense to me, since I could just splice it using a junction box or even with a pigtail in the main box and it would effectively be the same thing.

However, I'm pretty sure I read in Knights book (based on CEC) that a breaker can only supply a single circuit.

What is the right answer here?

Thanks,

George

6pack
June 15th, 2003, 11:12 PM
sounds like these are 240V rated heaters. I would repost the voltage, amperage or watts each unit draw's. Plus size of wire feeding them. Not sure if any Canadian Rules would differ here? If small enough you would still most likely need 3 D/P 15amp circuits.

imported_gbeichho
June 16th, 2003, 05:34 AM
240V 2 wire. The total Wattage on the 2 heaters would be 1000 + 1000 = 2000. I know that a dual 15A with 14/2 can handle 2880 Watts @ 240VAC.

The question is fairly generic though:
- If I have 2 separate circuits running to a main panel,
- the combined circuits have a small enough load to be handled by 1 breaker
- the load types and maximum recepticle limits would normally allow the combination of these circuits (i.e. they could have been chained together when the wiring was done)

Can I put both circuits into a single breaker (or dual breaker for 240V) in the main panel?

George

imported_joed
June 16th, 2003, 09:23 AM
When you combine the two cable you have created one circuit. Yes you can combine the 2 circuits into 1.

Wgoodrich
June 16th, 2003, 09:08 PM
JOed is right only if connected by a wire nut for example before it gets to the breaker. The breaker must be a double pole breaker to get the 240 volts if a 120/240 volt system which I suspect you have.

The one circuit you read I suspect meant only one wire to a breaker connection. It may be spliced into one wire before you get to that breaker with your circuit to adhere to the one wire per breaker connection. [aka lug].

Hope this helps

Wg

Anonymous
June 25th, 2003, 06:48 AM
Wouldn't it be best to just replace the breakers with dual breakers? I can't remember the name of the things, but I'm talking about the type of breaker to use when you don't have enough space in a box for more breakers, so this breaker has 2-15 amp (or 2 - 20amp depending) circuits on it. This way, you can change out however many of these breakers you need, to eventually half the space the breakers are currently taking.

speckledpig
June 25th, 2003, 07:05 AM
Wouldn't it be best to just replace the breakers with dual breakers? I can't remember the name of the things, but I'm talking about the type of breaker to use when you don't have enough space in a box for more breakers, so this breaker has 2-15 amp (or 2 - 20amp depending) circuits on it. This way, you can change out however many of these breakers you need, to eventually half the space the breakers are currently taking.

You mean "slimline" breakers?

Do they make double-pole breakers in slimline form factor?

David

imported_marako
June 25th, 2003, 07:32 AM
I think he was refering to what I've seen called "tandem" breakers which put 2 breakers into a package that is the size and shape of a single normal breaker. This allows you to pull out 1 breaker and get two back into the same spot. Beware that not all panels can take tandems, and that there is a limit of 42 circuits (in US code). Also I've never seen a tandem double pole breaker (they may exist???) and while you can get "creative" with your wireing and use two tandems as two DP breakers it would be againts every code, and dangerous...... so don't even try.

Back to the original question. I don't know Canadian code so this may not hold water....

I'm guessing that in Canada you get basically the same stuff we do in the US (Sqaure D, GE, Siemens, etc...) I use primarily Sqaure D. The smaller single pole breakers (15 & 20 amp) are rated to accept 2 wires as far as I know. I'm not sure about their smaller DP breakers. If the panel/breakers you have can accept 2 wires (it would be indicated on the breaker) then by US code you can run two circuits off the one breaker. If Canadian code differs, or your breakers are not rated as such, the WG method of wire nutting the circuits together first, then attaching one wire to the breaker is your only "legal" option.

Anonymous
June 25th, 2003, 09:12 AM
I have seen double pole tandem breakers made by Bryant (Cutler Hammer BR). The inner two handles have a normal tie, and the outer two handles have a C shaped metal clip to tie the handles. I believe internally they are common trip, so it should work OK. However, they are hard to work and that outer set of handles is rather sloppy feeling.

I think you'd be better off to put two wires on the breaker if it is stamped to support that (and the CEC allows), or use the wire nut and pigtail solution.

imported_gbeichho
June 25th, 2003, 01:41 PM
Actually, it is two double pole circuits (2 x 240 VAC) that I want to combine.

i.e.
4 wires from 4 breakers - (2 ganged double breakers)
-> into 2 breakers - (1 ganged double breaker)

From what I understand, I would have to use 2 wirenuts in the box to join the 2 reds and two blacks and run 2 wires (1 pigtailed red, 1 pigtailed black) into the 2 breakers (1 double breaker).

I haven't seen any slimline breakers for Federal Pioneer anywhere in Canada...

George

imported_Ohm1
June 28th, 2003, 10:13 AM
To Jver. It's a twin breaker. A twin breaker can supply 120V to two different circuits. I'm still confused on how they operate?