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Unregistered
March 17th, 2005, 07:56 PM
Not sure if I have the spelling of wording correct here, but I need to wire a 120mig welder??? Not sure what the amp draw is on this 240volt unit. Any thoughts on how to wire this???? or what he typical amp draw is on a unit like this, i'm currently looking for a face-plate to help me out, but was curious if anyone has some experience on this topic. Thanks again!!!

Roger
March 17th, 2005, 08:28 PM
240 volt Mig welders typically require 20 or 30 amp circuits, if you could supply us with the brand and model # we can be more specific.

xkvator
March 18th, 2005, 06:10 AM
the 120V lincoln/miller mig welders have a 20 amp draw at their rated load - which is not the max. output amps of the machine. the rated output is 90 amps @ 20% duty cycle. the max. amps are 135 which could only be a 5 -10% duty cycle.
they will work fine on a 20a circuit if you observe the duty cycle......if not you'll get the machine hot and will trip the breaker.

xkvator
March 18th, 2005, 10:02 AM
i misread :o ...i thought 120volt. :confused: check the input voltage...most of the 120 amp migs are 120V.
as roger said - give them the details along with the distance you're going to have to run the wire from your panel.

Unregistered
March 23rd, 2005, 06:30 AM
I have some information (as well as some questions) on the actual arc welder I'll be installing. I'll only be installing the circuit, but I want to make sure this is done correctly. The arc welder will be a Lincoln Electric AC-225 K1170. Please provide as much info on the circuit installation as possible, but I've got a few questions that I'm curious about. I noticed this welder requires a NEMA 6-50P plug....Is that standard for most welders? Also, the data on this device throws me off a bit. Rated CC AC Ouput Amps are 225, Volts = 25, and Duty Cycle is 20%. The ouput range is 40-225 AC. 40 - 225 amps??? I'm sure this is just my unfamiliarity with wiring a 240 volt circuit, but 225 amps....I'm lost now on how to calculate my amp draw for this dedicated circuit with those listed specs. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
If you need to look at the product for more info......www.lincolnelectric.com

Roger
March 23rd, 2005, 07:12 AM
The information given for the welder's output ratings is for welding purposes only. You are concerned with the input rating. Checking the Lincoln website they list your welder (K 1170) at 50 amps input at rated output of 225 amps. This is the reason for the NEMA 6-50P. You will need to supply the welder with 2 #6 awg copper conductors and at least a #10 awg ground wire either in cable or individual wires in conduit. You will also need a NEMA 6-50R to plug the power cord into. Install a 50 amp double pole breaker in the panel to protect the circuit.
The 20% duty cycle simply means that you can weld continuously for 2 minutes out of 10 minutes at max output or a factory selected output before the thermal cut out shuts the welder down before it overheats. So if you weld continuously without breaking the arc for two minutes you will need to let the welder cool for 8 minutes before welding again.
Might check back as others will post here also with added information I'm sure. Seems to me there maybe some other code requirements for arc welders but dont have the code book handy.
Added thought: You seem to be new at SMAW welding so I would suggest that you buy a book on welding with arc welders. Anyone can weld but you really need to have some training and education on welding properly both for safety reasons and for quality of work. Type of steel and thickness and electodes used (sticks) determine what output rating you set the welder on. CC stands for constant current which is the typical output for welding AC. This allows voltage input to vary to maintain a constant current to the arc.
So if your arc length changes and varies as you weld the machine will increase or decrease voltage to keep constant current on the workpiece.

xkvator
March 23rd, 2005, 09:35 AM
Do you already have this welder or are you looking at one to buy?

in your first post you were talking about a mig welder and this one is an AC stick welder. And if new should come with a booklet with all the info you need, and as Roger stated, you seem to be new at welding and should definitely read all the SAFETY info.

and LINCOLN is one of the companies that will supply you with owners manuals, schematics, etc. and usually at no cost to you.

i've been welding for almost 40 years, and have used the k1170. Why did you select that particular machine? welding with AC limits your selection of rods...for hobby stuff you should be ok. stick welding takes some practice (more than mig) as you have to feed the rod AND follow the joint. it takes practice.

Roger filled you in on the wiring...if you have any questions about welding, I'll be glad to help if i can. if it's not electrical related...post in TOOLS.

you might also look into your local vo-tech and community college - they have courses for beginner welders...you'll learn a lot.

Unregistered
March 23rd, 2005, 12:24 PM
I'm only wiring the circuit for this arc welder...not welding folks. The added information is great, but I just need to understand the specifications and how they relate to wiring a welder...so when I heard about duty cycle, etc., it threw me off a bit. I guess what I'm saying is...understanding the specs on a arc welder is a little different than the information on the faceplate of a refrigerator. I'll probably be inquiring again. Thanks!!

Speedy Petey
March 23rd, 2005, 03:17 PM
Are you wiring the receptacle now for a future buy? A 6-50 receptacle is pretty standard for a stick welder and larger MIG's.

dremmel
March 23rd, 2005, 08:45 PM
Are you wiring the receptacle now for a future buy? A 6-50 receptacle is pretty standard for a stick welder and larger MIG's.
Speedy, the unregistered guest is actually AMP, but when he posts a thread from his place of work he comes up as unregistered. He and I are installing a new service for a customer of mine which is a co-worker of his. We worked together well when we were students at Voc Tech so every now and then we get to work together again. This customer wants a number of additional new circuits run, one of which is for a welder he plans to purchase and use. The info Amp supplied is what is on the welder the customer presently uses at another location. Amp wanted to deal with this circuit on his own so I don't have much insite about it. What he wants to know, primarily, is what amperage breaker and respective cable should we install for the future use of a welder. I personnally know nothing about welders but I'm assuming a 50amp breaker would be plenty?

Roger
March 23rd, 2005, 10:34 PM
The information given in my previous reply is a direct result of reading the manufacturers wiring specifications from the pdf file on the website for this model of welder.

xkvator
March 24th, 2005, 06:12 AM
if whoever this welder circuit is for hasn't bought it yet, I recommend he buy the AC/DC model - K1297. or look at the MILLER THUNDERBOLT XL AC/DC...one nice feature on this machine is the infinite amp adjustment.
either machine uses the same wiring specs as Roger has given you in his previous post - #6.

Speedy Petey
March 24th, 2005, 10:03 AM
if whoever this welder circuit is for hasn't bought it yet, I recommend he buy the AC/DC model - K1297. or look at the MILLER THUNDERBOLT XL AC/DC...one nice feature on this machine is the infinite amp adjustment.
either machine uses the same wiring specs as Roger has given you in his previous post - #6.
Problem is the Miller is not $99.
It amazes me to this day that people still buy Chinese junk tools. :rolleyes:

Unregistered
March 30th, 2005, 04:10 PM
how about this guys. He can buy whatever kinda welder he wants. I'll wire the circuit for him. Thanks for the thoughts on the actual model and it's pros and cons, but I'm not the one using the welder. This guy has been welding for years. I'll let him decide.