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BigFred2003
September 22nd, 2004, 03:09 PM
Our 20 yo Whirlpool oven has finally died. We just ordered a Jenn Air double wall oven and I'm trying to decide if the installation is a do it yourself project or if I should pay the $269 for installation. I am fairly competent with basic electrical work (wired my basement refinishing project myself), but don't have any special tools. From what I've been able to read, it's a pretty basic connection process. Do I need any special tools, like a crimper of some sort to make the connections? I haven't taken the old oven out yet to look at the existing connections. It's on a 60A circuit, so I don't have to replace any wire. Any advice would be appreciated.

jeff1
September 22nd, 2004, 06:54 PM
Hi,

From what I've been able to read, it's a pretty basic connection process

No model# posted but JennAir has many of the install and manuals available on thier web site if you need to have a peek....they will also be packed in the new oven.

JennAir web site (http://www.jennair.com/)

I'm trying to decide if the installation is a do it yourself project or if I should pay the $269 for installation.

269.00 *sounds* a bit high to me...JMO!!...but 2 people is best for a double oven to "pop" it in place!!

Do I need any special tools, like a crimper of some sort to make the connections?

Nope, most are marrette style connections inside a small junction box.

I am fairly competent with basic electrical work (wired my basement refinishing project myself)

Certainly -sounds- like you should have no problems hooking up the electrical for the new oven...esp if you can read and follow the instructions/tips that come with the oven :)

jeff.

BigFred2003
September 22nd, 2004, 07:44 PM
Jeff,
It's the JJW9630D. I've read the manual online for installation and it doesn't look too intimidating. The only question I really have now is the wire connections. I've read some posts that refer to crimping the connections, but it sounds like a standard wirenut of some form (not sure what a "marrette" type is) is used. As far as I can tell, it's only three wires to hookup. The price I was quoted was from Home Depot and included the removal of the old stove (but not disposal). My son and I are game for the challenge. Thanks for the info.

jeff1
September 23rd, 2004, 04:11 AM
Hi,

not sure what a "marrette" type is

http://www.repairclinic.com/dbimages/00000128/00036815.jpg

Extra large wire connector with spring insert (http://www.repairclinic.com/referral.asp?R=153&N=241056)

My son and I are game for the challenge.

If you get a chance, let us know how the job went :)

jeff.

BigFred2003
October 2nd, 2004, 02:50 PM
My wife is busily learning how to use her new oven and cooktop. Got both installed and connected this morning and they're working like a champ. Thanks for the info. Couple of questions...the oven is on a 50A breaker, the cooktop on a 30A. According to the faceplate data, they call for a 60A and 40A respectively. (The existing supply wire is 8ga (oven) and 10ga (cooktop) aluminum so it could handle the bigger breakers. I used the proper cu-al connectors and anti-oxide paste) I turned both units on with the max power draw and neither breaker blew. Is there a safety issue I should be aware of, or can I hold what I have with breakers? The leads off both devices appear to be 10ga. Thanks for any insight.

jeff1
October 2nd, 2004, 09:12 PM
Hi,

the oven is on a 50A breaker, the cooktop on a 30A.

That is what the most common ones we install require.

K.W. RATING ON SERIAL PLATE
a 0 - 4.8
b 4.9 - 6.9
c 7.0 - 9.9
d 10.0 - 11.9
e 12.0 - 14.9
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM CIRCUIT PROTECTION IN AMPERS
a 20
b 30
c 40
d 50
e 60
WIRE SIZE (AWG)
a 12
b 10
c 8
d 8
e 6

Match the letters.

I turned both units on with the max power draw and neither breaker blew

That sounds good so far!! :)

jeff.

BigFred2003
October 3rd, 2004, 08:18 PM
I spoke too soon. My oven is popping the breaker when both the top and bottom are turned on. Here's my question. My supply wire from the 50A breaker is 8ga. The wire harness that connects from the junction box (using wirenuts) to the oven (using a screw terminal block) is 10ga. According to the charts, I need 6 ga for the 60A breaker. However, using the factory-supplied harness, this circuit will have a combo of 10 and 6ga wire. Can I install a 60A breaker without changing out the supply wire to 6ga? Why does the manufacturer call for a 60A breaker that requires 6ga wire, but then use 10ga wire on the connecting harness that the 6ga wire is connected to? I'm confused and don't want to do something that is unsafe, but can't figure this one out. Thanks for any clarification on this.

jeff1
October 4th, 2004, 03:38 AM
Hi,

Post the KWrating off of the model/serial tag and we will get WG's opinion. The wire between the house connection and the appliance always seems to be smaller, chances are for ease of installing behind the oven is one reason.

jeff.

BigFred2003
October 4th, 2004, 09:38 AM
The upper oven is rated at 7.2KW, and the lower is rated at 5.4 KW for 12.6 KW total. This falls into the 60A breaker range, but the harness wire is definitely not 6GA. WG, any insight into this? Thanks.

BigFred2003
October 4th, 2004, 09:39 AM
I forgot, it's the Jenn Air 9630DD, double convection oven.

Ron
October 4th, 2004, 11:15 AM
The manufacturer is permitted to have smaller wire sizes within the oven/cooktop, as long as it is UL listed that way. On the other hand, you must use properly sized wire within your home to connect to the factory sized wire. So in your case, you will have a 60A breaker serving #6CU wire in you walls, then spliced with a wirenut at the oven to the #10 provided by the manufacturer.

jeff1
October 4th, 2004, 01:14 PM
Hi,

The manufacturer is permitted to have smaller wire sizes within the oven/cooktop, as long as it is UL listed that way

Interesting!!

jeff.

Ron
October 4th, 2004, 05:41 PM
From the install instructions of a GE oven http://products.geappliances.com/ProdContent/Dispatcher?REQUEST=ITEMID&itemid=31-10524-5

NOTE TO ELECTRICIAN: The 3 power
leads supplied with this appliance are
UL recognized for connection to heavier
gauge household wiring. The insulation
of these 3 leads is rated at temperatures
much higher than the temperature rating
of household wiring. The current carrying
capacity of the conductor is governed
by the wire gauge and the temperature
rating of the insulation around the wire.

Wgoodrich
October 4th, 2004, 07:32 PM
220.19 Note 4 requires that you size the branch circuit conductor serving that double oven by the name plate rating;

YOu quoted 7.2 and 5.4 totalling over 12 kw being a total of 12.6. now divide that by 240 volt and you get 52.5 amps. Check 240.6 for normal breaker sizes and the next larger breaker as required calls for this load jumps from 50 to 60 amps. Then check table 310.16 and using the 60 degree column as required per 210.14.c for all conductor under 100 amps you will find 6 awg copper branch circuit to be rated 55 amps. Then refer to 240.4.B allows us to adjust up to the next size breaker when conductor ampacity lands between breaker sizes thus allowing 60 amp breaker on 6 awg copper branch circuit conductor.

Then if you go to tap conductors for appliances it allows ul listed manfactured products with conductors less that 6' long to be tapped much smaller than the branch circuit conductor the NEC requires in the home. Manufacturiing design is commonly much smaller. If you look inside you will find several smaller wires going to different loads within the appliance serving only that certain component of the entire makup of the ovens.

You need 6 awg and 60 amp breaker.

One thing not mentioned is an insulated neutral conductor required with that branch circuit serving an oven. If you install a new branch circuit it must be a black red white and bare or green set of 4 conductors serving as two hot wire one insulated neutral conductor and one bare or green wire for equipment grounding. per NEC 250.140. YOu have 120 volt components using the current carrying neutral conductor as a return path inside that double oven.

Wire nuts are commonly used in a junction box installed in the cabinet behind or below the oven to connect the oven whip [not over 6' long] and the branch circuit conductors.

HOpe this helps

Wg

jeff1
October 4th, 2004, 07:39 PM
Howdy,

Even more interesting! :D

jeff.

BigFred2003
October 5th, 2004, 06:51 AM
Thanks for the great info. Fortunately running new 6 awg will be fairly easy since I still have access to most of my basement ceiling, and it's only about an 8 ft run of wire to the junction box. Appreciate all the good info and feedback from all. I've learned more from this site than anywhere else.