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Collins
July 6th, 2004, 10:54 AM
1. For the bedrooms ARC circuits - Do they have to be 12/2 circuits? Can you use 14/2?

2. I have two 200 amp panels (one for the basement and one for upstairs). Do I need to ground the two boxes together?

3. Can you run wire in the same holes as the Pex water tubes?


Thanks for you help!

Brent

Collins
July 6th, 2004, 11:01 AM
1.Can you have other outlets on the ARC breakers besides the Bedroom ?



Thanks

suemarkp
July 6th, 2004, 01:12 PM
1. For the bedrooms ARC circuits - Do they have to be 12/2 circuits? Can you use 14/2?

2. I have two 200 amp panels (one for the basement and one for upstairs). Do I need to ground the two boxes together?

3. Can you run wire in the same holes as the Pex water tubes?

1. At least per NEC rules, you may have 15A or 20A circuits serving bedrooms. If you use a 20A arc fault breaker, then the entire circuit must have #12 wire. If you install #14 wire, or (god forbid) mix #14 and #12, then you'll have to use a 15A arc fault breaker.

2. Yes, but that should have already been done. Are these two panels side by side and part of your main service (like a typical 400A service)? Or is one panel downstairs and one upstairs? Depending on the answer, the method and wire size is different. But in both cases, there should be either a common neutral/ground or separate 4th ground that ties these two together.

3. I think you can, but would recommend you do not do that. The plumber may not have put his pipes in the center of the stud. Even if he did, I would make my own 3/4" holes for wires. Note that if you have less the 1.25" of space from the wire to the stud face, a metal plate must be installed on the stud to protect the wire from nail damage.

And for your question about bedroom circuits going to other locations, that is permitted also. Just realize that if even one "outlet" is in a bedroom, then that whole branch circuit must be AFCI protected. And "outlet" means receptacle, light fixture, smoke detector, ....any box where power is used by a device. Also note that the converse is not true -- bathroom and kitchen counter circuits can't go to other rooms.

Collins
July 7th, 2004, 05:58 AM
Mark, In a bathroom I thought the lights and fan could be on another circuit but the outlets had to be GFCI protected should be on a bathroom outlet only circuit? I have three bathrooms to wire.


Thanks Brent

suemarkp
July 7th, 2004, 10:01 AM
You have two choices for bathrooms:

1. A 20A circuit that powers everything in only one bathroom (receptacles, lights, fan).
2. A 20A circuit that powers the receptacle outlets in one or more bathrooms. The lights and fan must be on a different circuit, and this circuit could be a bedroom circuit if you want it to be.

I'd recommend that you use method 1 for each bathroom unless one is so small a blow dryer will probably never be used in it. In all cases, the bathroom receptacles must be GFCI'd.